A growth mindset intervention can change students’ grades if school culture is supportive

Boosting academic success does not have to derive from new teachers or curriculum; it can also come from changing students’ attitudes about their abilities through a short online intervention, according to the latest findings from the National Study of Learning Mindsets published in Nature on Aug. 7.

The experimental study involved more than 12,000 ninth graders in a national, representative sample of 65 public high schools across the United States.

Läs mer [EurekAlert!]

Earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters obey same mathematical pattern

Researchers from the Centre for Mathematical Research (CRM) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have mathematically described the frequency of several dangerous phenomena according to their size with more precision than ever.

Using new statistical tools, researchers have rigorously demonstrated how the frequency of earthquakes, hurricanes, torrential rains and meteorite impacts can be described with the same mathematical rule. However, other phenomena such as forest fires and land subsidence follow a different rule.

Läs mer [EurekAlert!]

Small class size vs. evidence-based interventions

The Ministry of Education in France introduced a policy in 2002 that reduced class size to no more than 12 pupils in areas determined to have social difficulties and high proportions of at-risk pupils, called Zones d’Education Prioritaire (ZEP).

In order to evaluate the effectiveness and usefulness of this policy, researcher Jean Ecalle and colleagues in France examined the results of the policy-mandated class size reduction on the reading achievement of first grade (Year 2) pupils (Study 1), and compared them to the effects of an evidence-based literacy intervention on the reading achievement of at-risk children in normal-sized classes (20 pupils) (Study 2).

Läs mer [Best Evidence in Brief]

Culture shapes how we learn to reason?

If you made any plans for next week, congratulations! You’ve demonstrated a key feature of being human: being able to think beyond the here and now – or, think abstractly. But when babies learn different kinds of abstract thought, and how, is still hotly debated by psychologists. Now new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that cultural environment may play a role.

Läs vidare/Read more [EurekAlert!]

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!