NOMAD 14(4), 2009. An investigation of Norwegian students’ affective domain in mathematics

Skapad: 2010-02-19. Ändrad: 2010-02-19  

NOMAD 14(4), 2009. An investigation of Norwegian students’ affective domain in mathematics

An investigation of Norwegian students’ affective domain in mathematics

KIRSTI KISLENKO

Abstract

After decades of research in the affective domain in mathematics education, and search for ways to enhance students’ positive attitudes towards the discipline, the perception that to be able to do mathematics is innate remains a widespread belief. Already twenty years ago the Fourth NAEP study concluded that students believe mathematics to be important, difficult and based on rules, and theses attributions also characterise the view of mathematics even two decades later. As a relationship exists between the claims ”mathematics is difficult” and ”mathematics is boring” one could assume that students lack interest towards mathematics. The previous conclusions about the present situation are made based on a study carried out in Norway in 2005 investigating six factors in relation to students’ affective domain in mathematics – interest, hard-working, self-confidence, usefulness, insecurity, and MAD (Mathematics as an Absolute Discipline).

Sammanfattning

Elevers uppfattningar om och attityder till matematik är viktiga eftersom de är relaterade till resultaten av lärandet i matematik. Utgående från en studie som genomfördes i Norge 2005 verkar det som om elevers syn på matematik skulle kunna relateras till sex faktorer: intresse, att arbeta hårt, självförtroende, användbarhet, ängslan och MAD (matematik som en absolut disciplin). Trots att eleverna saknar intresse för matematik kan de erkänna dess användbarhet, betydelse och att man måste arbeta hårt med matematik. Nästan hälften av eleverna tror på medfödd förmåga att lära matematik.

Appendix

KIRSTI KISLENKO
Kirsti Kislenko is a PhD student in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Agder in Kristiansand, Norway. Main research interests are students’ beliefs and attitudes towards
mathematics teaching and learning.